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Bernard T. Feld papers

 Collection — Multiple Containers
Identifier: MC-0167

Scope and Contents of the Collection

The Bernard Taub Feld papers document the academic, professional, and political pursuits of Feld during the period 1943 to 1990.

The collection illustrates Feld's accomplishments as a research physicist and educator as well as his extensive involvement in national and international disarmament efforts. The collection offers a perspective on the politicization of the international scientific community during the post-World War II period and the Vietnam era, and the activities and organization of arms control and disarmament groups. Feld's research in the area of high-energy physics and the expansion of nuclear science research at MIT is also reflected in the papers.

Dates

  • 1943 - 1990

Creator

Access note

Materials in this collection are open unless they are marked as restricted. Restrictions are noted in the container list.

Intellectual Property Rights

Access to collections in the Department of Distinctive Collections is not authorization to publish. Separate written application for permission to publish must be made to Distinctive Collections. Copyright of some items in this collection may be held by respective creators, not by the donor of the collection.

Biographical note

Biography through 1983

Bernard Taub Feld, high-energy nuclear physicist and notable member of the international arms control and disarmament community, was born to Louis and Helen (Taub) Feld on December 21, 1919, in Brooklyn, New York. He received his elementary and secondary education in the Brooklyn public school system and in 1935, at age fifteen, entered the City College of New York. He began his undergraduate studies in history but changed his academic emphasis to physics and was graduated from CCNY in 1939 with the bachelor of science degree. His decision to study physics was influenced by Hyman H. Goldsmith, who later founded with Eugene Rabinowitch the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.

Manhattan Project

In 1939 Feld began graduate study at Columbia University and was later appointed teaching assistant to Isador I. Rabi and Enrico Fermi. Feld subsequently was given the opportunity to assist Fermi and Visiting Professor Leo Szilard in their efforts to produce a self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. In 1941 Feld suspended his graduate studies in order to relocate to the University of Chicago where he continued his association with Szilard and Fermi. On December 2, 1942, the first controlled nuclear chain reaction was achieved at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory. In 1943 Feld left Chicago for Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to participate in the design and construction of experimental atomic pile and separation facilities. Within the year, the Oak Ridge Laboratory had manufactured the first milligrams of plutonium from uranium. From Oak Ridge, Feld went to the Los Alamos Laboratory of the University of California and was Assistant Group Leader of Critical Assemblies from 1944 to 1946. At Los Alamos he contributed to the development of the experimental plutonium bomb that was later detonated in the desert at Alamogordo, New Mexico.

Teaching and Professional Activities

After receiving his doctorate from Columbia University, he was appointed instructor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1946. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1948, associate professor in 1952, and professor in 1955. He served as head of the physics department's Division of Nuclear and High-Energy Physics from 1975 to 1980.

During his career, Feld's work focused on experimental and theoretical research in high-energy nuclear physics, particularly theoretical interactions between fundamental particles. Among his significant scientific efforts was his contribution to the development of the Cambridge Electron Accelerator (CEA), a six-billion-electron-volt synchrotron, dedicated September 1962, and jointly owned and operated by MIT and Harvard University. Feld was one of six academic members of the CEA Executive Committee from 1961 to 1966. Among the responsibilities of the committee were the establishment of management policies and the approval of contractual arrangements. From 1961 to 1962 Feld was chair of the Scientific Subcommittee which evaluated research programs and proposals.

Feld was also active in the administration of the MIT Laboratory of Nuclear Science (LNS), serving as acting director from 1961 to 1962 and member of the LNS Steering Committee from 1975 to 1982. He was committee chair for the Conference on Photon Interactions of the BeV-Energy Range which was held at MIT on January 26-30, 1963. The international conference was attended by more than 300 physicists who met to discuss the use of high-energy accelerators in the study of atomic nuclei.

Throughout his career, Feld has been engaged as a consultant for governmental and industrial agencies and has served on several national scientific committees. His appointments have included the Committee on High Energy Physics, National Science Foundation, 1956-1960; Consultant to the Physics Department of the Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1947-; and Consultant in the field of theoretical physics, recombination, and magnetohydrodynamics with AVCO Manufacturing Corporation, Research and Development Division, Everett, Massachusetts, 1955-1965.

Outside of MIT he has taught at the University of Rome, where he was a Guggenheim Fellow and visiting professor from 1953 to 1955, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, Switzerland, where he was a Ford Foundation Fellow and visiting scientist from 1960 to 1961. In 1966-1967 he was visiting professor at the École Polytechnique in Paris and research associate at the Centre de Recherche, Saclay, France. He also lectured at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London, England, where he was visiting professor of theoretical physics from 1973 to 1975.

Feld has published extensively in professional journals (see Bibliography) and has written two books: Neutron Physics (published as Volume II, Experimental Nuclear Physics, New York: Wiley and Sons, 1954) and Models of Elementary Particles (Waltham, MA: Blaisdell Publishing Company, 1969). Since 1957 he has been an associate editor of Annals of Physics, a journal presenting original work in all areas of basic physics research. He also was employed as consulting science editor for Blaisdell Publishing Company, a division of Random House, Inc., from 1960 to 1970. As science editor, he acted in an advisory and editorial capacity to develop a series of college level physics textbooks for the publisher.

Arms Control and Disarmament Activities

Feld began his study of arms control and disarmament following the nuclear attack on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In 1945, during the first six months of his appointment at MIT, he took a leave of absence to join a Washington, DC coalition of former Manhattan Project scientists opposed to military control over nuclear research and weapons development. Working with the Federation of American Scientists, BTF successfully lobbied against the War Department sponsored May-Johnson Bill and for passage of the McMahon Bill which established the civilian-controlled Atomic Energy Commission.

Continuing his association with the Federation of American Scientists, he was elected several times to the Council and served as vice-president from 1962 to 1963. He contributed numerous articles to the journal, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, which was founded in 1946 to provide a forum in which members of the scientific community could discuss the social and political implications of their work. Feld was elected to serve on the Bulletin's Board of Directors in 1968 and has been editor-in-chief since 1976.

With the advent of the Cold War, the need to re-establish a dialogue between the United States and the Soviet Union became imperative. In 1955 Bertrand Russell and Albert Einstein appealed to the international scientific community to meet and discuss the issues created by the existence of nuclear weapons. After initial attempts by the Federation of American Scientists to re-establish East-West contact among scientists through written communication, a more effective exchange began in 1957 through the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs. (For fuller explanation of the Pugwash movement see Historical note.)

In 1958, at Bertrand Russell's invitation, Feld began his association with the Pugwash Movement. He became increasingly involved through attending annual and semi-annual conferences and contributing to their organization. In 1963 the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS) assumed the responsibility of coordinating American involvement in Pugwash activities through its Committee on Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs (P-COSWA). Feld, appointed committee chair, received the mandate to arrange American participation in the International Pugwash Conferences, prepare American studies and activities relating to these conferences, and solicit financial support for Pugwash endeavors. Feld remained chair of the Academy's Committee on P-COSWA until 1973.

He also served as one of three American representatives on the Pugwash Continuing Committee from 1966 to date. The Committee, incorporating members from the United States, the Soviet Union, Eastern and Western Europe, Asia, and Latin America, is responsible for the organization of the International Pugwash Conferences, publications, and maintaining contact with the National Pugwash Groups.

Feld was appointed secretary-general of Pugwash following the retirement of Joseph Rotblat in 1974. In this capacity, Feld not only served as head of the Pugwash organization but was responsible for the implementation of the decisions of the Continuing Committee. At the time of his appointment, Feld was on sabbatical leave at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London. He maintained an office at the Pugwash headquarters in London until he had exhausted his leave from MIT. He temporarily relocated the Secretariat to his MIT office while he continued to serve as secretary-general until 1977.

The late 1950s and early 1960s witnessed the growth of arms control and national security studies in the United States. Members of the faculty at MIT and Harvard University were actively involved in the development of these fields, participating in innovative programs such as the 1960 American Academy of Arts and Sciences' Summer Study on Arms Control. In 1957 the Greater Boston Branch of the Federation of American Scientists had begun to investigate the technical problems of arms limitation. A year later, the AAAS Council voted to sponsor a project analyzing the problems of arms control and appointed the FAS Disarmament Study Group to act as an ad hoc Academy Committee.

As chair of the FAS Group, Feld became head of the Academy's Committee on the Technical Problems of Arms Limitation and director of the Committee's 1960 Summer Study on Arms Control. Numerous publications were generated as a result of the Summer Study, attended by approximately fifty political, social, and physical scientists and engineers representing universities and research institutions from across the country. Feld wrote the Introduction to Arms Reduction: Program and Issues (David H. Frisch, ed., Twentieth Century Fund, NY, 1961), in which he described and analyzed the purpose and accomplishments of the Summer Study. He also contributed an article, "Inspection Techniques of Arms Control," to the Fall 1960 issue of the Academy's journal Daedalus, "Arms Control and National Security," in which he discussed various types of inspection and surveillance techniques for controlled and prohibited military projects.

Concurrent with the above activities, Feld was involved in the administration of the Washington- based Council for a Livable World (CLW). Founded by Leo Szilard in 1961, the intent of the Council was to provide financial and intellectual support to United States senatorial candidates who were committed to the objective of nuclear arms control. Feld's administrative involvement with CLW began in 1962 when he was elected council president. He headed the Council until 1973 when he assumed the position of co-chair and remained in that capacity until 1978. During Feld's eleven-year tenure as president, Senate candidates receiving CLW financial support included George McGovern (D., South Dakota), Walter Mondale (D., Minnesota), and Mark Hatfield (R., Oregon). Also during this period the Council, through its lobbying efforts, contributed to the postponement of congressional appropriations for the Sentinel anti-ballistic missile system, the prohibition of the use of biological weapons, and adoption of the partial Test Ban Treaty of 1963.

Other Activities

The Boston Area Faculty Group on Public Issues was founded in 1961 to provide a forum in which the local academic community could address significant public issues. Feld as a member of the Steering Committee participated in drafting an open letter, published in the New York Times, to President John F. Kennedy, communicating concern over the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. He also co-authored "An Answer to Teller," an article published in the April 14, 1962, Saturday Evening Post responding to a series of articles written by nuclear physicist and disarmament opponent Edward Teller.

Other political groups with which Feld has been affiliated include the Task Force for the Nuclear Test Ban, the Educational Committee to Halt Atomic Weapons, the Universities National Anti- War Fund, and the Union of Concerned Scientists. The latter was the primary sponsoring organization for the MIT-initiated March 4, 1969, research stoppage protesting the United States involvement in the Vietnam conflict and the government's use of scientific and technological knowledge. As a senior faculty member, Feld participated in the organization of the March 4 activities and contributed to a panel discussion addressing the topic "Arms Control, Disarmament and Security." Nationally, between thirty and fifty universities stopped their scientific research and participated in public discussion of the relationship between science and government.

Feld has written and lectured extensively on the issue of arms limitation and edited two books addressing the issue of disarmament: Impact of New Technologies on the Arms Race (with T. Greenwood, G. W. Rathjens, and S. Weinberg, MIT Press, 1971) and The Future of the Sea- Based Deterrent (with K. Tsipis and A. H. Cahn, MIT Press, 1973). He also published a collection of his papers entitled A Voice Crying in the Wilderness: Essays on Science and World Affairs (Pergamon Press, 1979).

-----

Feld retired from MIT in 1990. He died on February 19, 1993, at the age of 73. MIT News Office obituary: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/1993/feld-0224.html

Professional Appointments and Activities through 1983

1946-1950
National Research Council, Committee on Nuclear Science, Subcommittee on Neutron Standards
1946-1950
Consultant, Radium Chemical Corp., NYC
1946-1950
Consultant, Nuclear Propulsion of Aircraft Project (NEPA), Oak Ridge
1947-
Consultant to Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory
1948
Participant, MIT Lexington Project
1948-1953
Consultant, Nuclear Development Corporation of America, White Plains, New York
1953-1954 and 1966-1967
John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellow
1953-1954
Visiting Professor of Physics, University of Rome, Italy
1954
Visiting Lecturer, University of Padua, Italy
1955-1965
Consultant, AVCO Manufacturing Corp., Research and Development Division, Everett, Massachusetts
1956
Participant, Summer Symposium on Nuclear Energy, General Atomic Division of General Dynamics Corp., San Diego, California
1956-1960
Consultant, General Atomic Division of General Dynamics Corp., San Diego, California
1956-1960
National Research Council, Committee Advisory to the Office of Ordnance Research
1957-1960
Trustee, Brookhaven National Laboratory
1957-
Annals of Physics
1958-1960
National Science Foundation, Committee on High-Energy Physics
1960-1961
Visiting Scientist and Ford Foundation Fellow, CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
1960
Director, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Summer Study on Arms Control
1960-1970
Consulting Editor, Blaisdell Publishing Company
1961-1967
Executive Committee, Cambridge Electron Accelerator
1961-1973; 1973-1978
President, Council for a Livable World; Co-Chairman
1962-1963
Vice-Chairman, Federation of American Scientists
1962-1973
Chairman, Committee on "Pugwash" Conferences on Science and World Affairs, American Academy of Arts and Sciences
1965-1966
Chairman, Scientific Committee, Cambridge Electron Accelerator
1966-1967
Visiting Professor of Physics, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris
1966-1967
Visiting Research Associate, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire, Saclay, France
1966-1973; 1975- ; 1973-1977
Member, International Continuing Committee, Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs; Chairman, Executive Committee; Secretary-General
1968- ; 1976-
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
1970-1972
Member, National Board of UNAF
1971
Impact of New Technologies on the Arms Race
1972
The Collected Works of Leo Szilard: Scientific Papers
1973
The Future of the Sea-Based Deterrent
1973-1975
Visiting Professor of Theoretical Physics, Imperial College of Science and Technology, London
1977
Pugwash on Self-Reliance
1977-1979
Chairman, Committee on Research Funds, American Academy of Arts and Sciences
1973-1975
Vice-President, Class 1, American Academy of Arts and Sciences
1975-1980
Head, Division of Nuclear and High Energy Physics, MIT Department of Physics
1975
Leo Szilard Award for Physics in the Public Interest, American Physical Society
1975
Public Service Award, Federation of American Scientists

Historical note

Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs - History through 1983

The decade following the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki witnessed the emergence of a nuclear arms race between the United States and the Soviet Union. In the environment of the Cold War, Bertrand Russell issued an appeal in 1955 to members of the international scientific community to "... assemble in conference to appraise the perils that have arisen as a result of the development of weapons of mass destruction..." Albert Einstein and nine other distinguished scientists joined with Russell in signing what became known as the Russell-Einstein Manifesto. With this initiative, a conference was planned, and financing was received from Cleveland industrialist Cyrus Eaton. The first conference was held at Eaton's estate in the small fishing village of Pugwash, Nova Scotia, July 7-10, 1957. The Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs have since been held at a variety of international locations on an annual and semi-annual basis. Members of the world scientific community gather in an unofficial capacity to discuss nuclear proliferation and propose measures by which the scientific community can influence governments in reaching international agreements limiting the accumulation and use of nuclear weapons. Since the late 1960s, topics discussed at the Pugwash Conferences have broadened to include environmental pollution, world overpopulation, the energy crisis, and problems of the developing nations.

The Pugwash organization is administered by the Pugwash Council (formerly known as the Pugwash Continuing Committee) whose members are elected by the participants of the International Conferences. A total of twenty-four individuals constitute the Committee: three Americans, three Soviets, five representatives from Third World nations, the two ex-secretary-generals, and the remainder from countries in Eastern and Western Europe. The committee is responsible for the organization of all international Pugwash activities and is headed by the Secretary-General, Dr. Martin M. Kaplan, who maintains offices in London and Geneva.

Since participation in the International Conferences is limited, regional groups have been established to provide a wider forum in which the scientific community can contribute to the discussion of the political, social, and moral implications of science and technology. Approximately thirty National Pugwash Groups are engaged in activities which range from routinely submitting participant nominations for the International Conferences to actively organizing and sponsoring symposia and regional conferences.

In the United States, the National Pugwash Group is under joint sponsorship of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. The activities of the American Pugwash Group are directed by the Committee on Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs (P-COSWA) of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. This committee, formed in 1963, is the successor of the Academy's Committee on the Public Responsibilities of Scientists. The American Pugwash Group is particularly active and, in addition to organizing American participation in the International Conferences, has organized several regional symposia and sponsored International Conferences held in the United States.

Additional information concerning the Pugwash Movement may be found in the following publications written by Joseph Rotblat, physicist, radiologist, and past secretary-general of Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs: Pugwash--A History of the Conferences on Science and World Affairs (Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, 1967) and Scientists in the Quest for Peace--A History of the Pugwash Conferences (MIT Press, 1972).

Extent

83 Cubic Feet (24 record cartons, 58 manuscript boxes, 1 legal manuscript box)

Language of Materials

English

Abstract

The Bernard Taub Feld papers document his academic, professional, and political pursuits during the period 1943 to 1990. The bulk of the material dates from the mid-1950s, reflecting his establishment in the scientific community and his increased interest in nuclear arms control.

Arrangement of the Collection

The papers that were processed in 1983 have been organized in six series: Series 1. Biographical and Personal Materials; Series 2. Subject and Correspondence Files; Series 3. Teaching Materials and MIT Records; Series 4. Pugwash Movement Materials; Series 5. Writings and Publications; Series 6. Information Files.

For the most part, the papers are in their original folder units, and folder headings used by Feld have been retained. The arrangement is alphabetical and, within each folder unit, roughly chronological. No re-ordering was done within the folders. Correspondence pertaining to related subjects may be found in both general correspondence files and under relevant subject headings.

Materials received after 1983 are unprocessed.

Location note

Materials are stored off-site. Advance notice is required for use.

Acquisition note

The papers were given to the Department of Distinctive Collections (formerly the Institute Archives and Special Collections) in four groups between 1979 and 1990 by Bernard Feld. Additional material was received in 1996 and 1997, after Feld's death.

Materials Separated from Collection

Twenty-five physics theses, directed by Feld and available at Distinctive Collections, were separated from the collection.

Missing Title

  1. Beling, John Kingsman. The Alpha-Gamma Angular Correlation in the Decay of Radiothorium. 1951.
  2. Berger, Steven B. Electromagnetic Decays of Hadrons. 1973
  3. Buffington, Andrew and Mockett, Paul. Intermediate 2-Body States in the Reaction p+p⇒nπ. 1962
  4. Burkhardt, James L. and Fox, John D. The M.I.T. Linear Accelerator As a Pulsed Neutron Source for a Time-of-Flight Neutron Spectrometer. 1951
  5. Burman, Robert L. The Determination of Absolute Neutron Flux. 1955
  6. Costa, Giovanni. Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction According to the "Atomic Model." 1959
  7. Diffey, Carol Ann. The Angular Momentum and Parity of the 670 Mev. Resonance in π- - Proton Scattering. 1959.
  8. Dobson, Peter N., Jr. The Parity of the K-Meson. 1958
  9. Feinberg, Frank L. Light Cone Physics. 1973.
  10. Foglesong, George M. Investigation of the Model of the Λ and Σ Hyperons as Isospin-conserving Bound States of a Nucleon and an Antikaon. 1962.
  11. Layson, William M. The Scattering Matrix for Pion-Nucleon Collisions Above the Threshold for Strange Particles. 1961
  12. Maglić, Bogdan C. Polarization of Protons in High Energy Interactions. 1959.
  13. Markiewicz, Robert. Updating the λ-excitation Quark Model for Baryon Resonances. 1969.
  14. Morgan, Thomas. S-wave Virtual Pion Correction to Compton Scattering. 1959.
  15. Nelson, Bruce Allen. The Polarization of Protons by Small Angle Scattering. 1960.
  16. Osborne, L. S. Neutron Cross Sections and Nuclear Level Spacing. 1949.
  17. Parks, Joel Harris. The Photodisintegration of the Deuteron at High Energies. 1959.
  18. Perez-Esandi, Jose J. Consequences of SU3 Symmetry on the Scattering of Members of a Particle Octet by Deuterium. 1964.
  19. Russell Allison Dean. Phase Space Methods in the Analysis of High Energy Experiments. 1964
  20. Sawtelle, William J. Measurement of the Bremsstrahlung Spectrum of the Linear Accelerator. 1955.
  21. Si-Chang, Fung. The Study of the Masses and Decay Moods of Positive K-Mesons. 1956.
  22. Zier, Robert E. Fermi-Yang Model Applied to Unstable Mesons. 1964.

Bibliography A. Non-technical Publications and Lectures

Many of these publications can be found in Series 5. Writings and Publications
  • A. "Science and the Atomic Bomb." The American Teacher, January 1946.
  • 1. "Technical Problems of Arms Limitation." Proceedings of Third Pugwash Conference, Kitzbuhel-Vienna, Austria, September 1958.
  • 2. "Can the Spread of Nuclear Weapons be Prevented?" Proceedings of Fourth Pugwash Conference, Baden, Austria, June 1959.
  • 3. "Control of Missiles and Satellites." Proceedings of Fourth Pugwash Conference, Baden, Austria, June 1959.
  • 4. "The Technical Problems of Arms Control" (with D.G. Brennan, D.H. Frisch, G.L. Quinn and R.S. Rochlin), Institute for International Order, New York, 1960.
  • 5. "Inspection Techniques of Arms Control," in Daedalus, Fall 1960, and in Arms Control, Disarmament, and National Security, Braziller, New York, 1961, Ch. 16.
  • 6. "Inspection Problems of Arms Limitation and Disarmament." Proceedings of Sixth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Moscow, USSR, 1960.
  • 7. "Introduction to the Report by the Summer Study on Arms Control." Proceedings of the Sixth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Moscow, USSR, 1960.
  • 8. Introduction to Arms Reduction: Program and Issues, Twentieth Century Fund, New York, 1961.
  • 9. "The Geneva Negotiations on General and Complete Disarmament," in Disarmament: Its Politics and Economics, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Boston, Ch. 2, pp. 7-17, Mielman, Editor, 1962.
  • 10. "Atmospheric Testing." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, January 1962.
  • 11. "An Approach to Comprehensive Disarmament." First Intercollegiate Conference on Disarmament and Arms Control, Swarthmore College, Feb. 16-18, 1962.
  • 12. "More Important than Shelters." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, April 1962.
  • 13. "An Answer to Teller" (with J. Orear, W. Schreiber, E. Salpeter, P. Morrison, G. Holton, S. Luria, M. Meselson). The Saturday Evening Post, April 1962.
  • 14. "On the Status of the 18-Nation Geneva Negotiations on General and Complete Disarmament." Proceedings of Ninth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Cambridge, England, August 1962.
  • 15. "On the Prospects for a Disarmament Agreement." Proceedings of the Tenth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, London, September 1962.
  • 16. "The Role of Pugwash in Advancing Disarmament." Proceedings of Twelfth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Udaipur, Jan. 1964.
  • 17. "The Future Role of Pugwash." Proceedings of Twelfth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Udaipur, Jan. 1964.
  • 18. "Comment on the Paper by A. Salam." Proceedings of the Twelfth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Udaipur, Jan. 1964.
  • 19. "The Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons." Proceedings of Thirteenth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Kurlovy Vary, Czechoslovakia, September 1964.
  • 20. "Planning in a Time of Inbetween." War/Peace Report, October 1964.
  • 21. "The Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, December 1964, pp. 2-6.
  • 22. "A Note on Vietnam." Proceedings of Fourteenth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Venice, Italy, April 1965.
  • 23. "Scientists in Politics." Seminar, University of Washington, May 11, 1965.
  • 24. "The Nagasaki Binge." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, February 1966.
  • 25. "The Chinese Bomb." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, September 1966, pp. 33-34.
  • 26. "General Remarks on Current Problems of Disarmament and European Security." Proceedings of Sixteenth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Sopot, Poland, September 1966.
  • 27. "Towards an Agreement on the Non-First-Use of Nuclear Weapons." Proceedings of the Sixteenth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Sopot, Poland, September 1966.
  • 28. "Security Problems of Developing Countries." Proceedings of Fifteenth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, December 1966.
  • 29. "A Pledge: No First Use." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, May 1967.
  • 30. "Accepted Rules of International Conduct -- 1967 Version." Proceedings of Seventeenth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Ronneby, Sweden, September 1967.
  • 31. "The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty -- In the Cards for 1968?" Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, March 1968
  • 32. "For Nuclear Disarmament." The New York Times, April 1, 1968.
  • 33. "Toward a New American Program for Peace." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, May 1968.
  • 34. "Problems of Inspection and Control of Disarmament Agreements"; "Some Problems of Inspection and Control for Disarmament"; "Problems of a Universal Nuclear Weapons Test-Ban Agreement," Pugwash International Summer School on Disarmament and Conflict Resolution, Pavia, Italy, August 1968.
  • 35. "After the Non-Proliferation Treaty -- What Next?" Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, September 1968.
  • 36. "Unless Peace Comes." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, November 1968.
  • 37. "Implications for Other Nations (particularly in Europe) of Superpower Anti-Ballistic Missile Deployment." Pugwash Monograph -- Implications of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems, Humanities Press, New York, 1969.
  • 38. "Scientists and Students in Europe: A Report from Prague and Paris." Technology Review, January 1969.
  • 39. "Missile Program." The New York Times. February 4, 1969.
  • 40. "Sakharov Chooses Survival." Tech Engineering News, April 1969.
  • 41. "CBW and Arms Control." Seminar, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, July 1969.
  • 42. "Can Mankind Make it into the 21st Century?" Seminar, Purdue University, November 20, 1969.
  • 43. "The Emperor's Invisible Clothes." Technology Review, December 1969.
  • 44. "The ABM and Arms Control." Chapter in ABM, An Evaluation of the Decision to Deploy an Antiballistic Missile System, Harper and Row, 1969.
  • 45. "For Nuclear Arms Cut." The New York Times, January 1, 1970.
  • 46. "Scientists' Role in Arms Control." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, January 1970.
  • 47. "Out of the Forest and into the Trees." Lecture, M.I.T., Spring 1970.
  • 48. "The Sorry History of Arms Control." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, September 1970.
  • 49. "The Oppenheimer Case -- Security on Trial." American Scientist, Fall 1970.
  • 50. "The Great Weapons Heresy." The Progressive, May 1970.
  • 51. "On the Consequences of Nuclear War -- A Reminder." Proceedings of the Twentieth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Fontana, Wisconsin, 1970.
  • 52. "The Stake at SALT Survival." The New York Times, December 9, 1970.
  • 53. "SALT Must Stop the Technological Race Toward Disaster." War/Peace Report, January 1971.
  • 54. Impact of New Technologies on the Arms Race. Editor (with T. Greenwood, G.W. Rathjens, and S. Weinberg), MIT Press, 1971.
  • 55. "Problems of Nuclear Power Production" in Impact of New Technologies on the Arms Race, MIT Press, 1971, pp. 249-275.
  • 56. "On the Role of Experts In and Out of Government." Symposium, University of Wisconsin, March 17, 1971.
  • 57. "SALT -- With a Dash of." The New York Times, July 9, 1971.
  • 58. "China and the Bomb." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, September 1971.
  • 59. "Current Developments and Dangers of Atomic Armaments." Conference of World Federation of Scientific Workers, Berlin, November 1971.
  • 60. "The 21st Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs." Science, December 10, 1971.
  • 61. "Mutual and Balanced Force Reductions in Europe (MBFR)." Council for a Livable World, March 7, 1972.
  • 62. "Current Developments and Dangers of Atomic Armaments." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, March 1972.
  • 63. "Nuclear Power in the Third World." The Internationalist, No. 6, May-June 1972.
  • 64. "ASW -- the ABM of the 1970's?" Stanford Journal of International Studies, Vol. VII, pp. 87-95, Spring 1972.
  • 65. "Looking at SALT II." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, June 1972.
  • 66. "The Trouble With SALT." Saturday Review, November 1972.
  • 67. "What is Pugwash Anyway? Scientists as Diplomats." The Nation, November 6, 1972, pp. 431-435.
  • 68. "Pugwash: Scientists in High Politics." Technology Review, January 1, 1973, p. 10.
  • 69. "Twenty-eight Years After Hiroshima -- Is the Nuclear Genie Finally On the Way Back Into the Bottle?" Lecture, University of Toronto, February 6, 1973.
  • 70. "Human Values and the Technology of Weapons." Zygon - Journal of Religion and Science, Vol. 8, No. 1, March 1973.
  • 71. "In Memorium: Lev A. Artsimovich." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Vol. 29, No. 4, April 1973.
  • 72. "Watergate." The New York Times, May 27, 1973.
  • 73. "Nuclear Proliferation: Thirty Years After Hiroshima." Talk presented to American Physical Society, April 1973.
  • 74. "The Contribution of Pugwash to Disarmament." Proceedings of the Twenty-Second Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Oxford, England, 1972, pp. 161-171.
  • 75. "Origins of Pugwash." In Eugene Rabinowitch Memorial Issue, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Vol. 29, No. 6, June 1973, pp. 4-6.
  • 76. "Energy: Curbing Our Wasteful Appetites." The Guardian, October 13, 1973.
  • 77. "Analyzing the Cold War." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, November 1973.
  • 78. "Anti-Submarine Warfare and the Sea-Based Deterrent -- Opportunities for Arms Control?" Survival, November/December 1973, pp. 268-274.
  • 79. The Future of the Sea-Based Deterrent. Editor (with K. Tsipis and A.H. Cahn), MIT Press, 1973.
  • 80. "On Legitimizing Public Service Science in the University." Daedalus, Winter 1974.
  • 81. "A Summary of the Problem of Environmental Pollution: What Can Be Done?" Scientific World, Spring 1974.
  • 82. "The Menace of a Fission Power Economy." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, April 1974, pp. 32-34.
  • 83. "India as the Sixth Nuclear Power." The Times, May 21, 1974.
  • 84. "Nuclear Energy -- Fact Versus Myth." Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Pugwash Conference, Baden, Austria, September 1974.
  • 85. "On the Assessment of Energy Needs vs. Demands." Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Pugwash Conference, Baden, Austria, September 1974.
  • 86. "Attempts at Nuclear Control -- Is the Cure Worse Than the Disease?" Lecture, University of London, October 8, 1974.
  • 87. "What Price Energy?" Lecture, London, October 1974.
  • 88. "The Charade of Piecemeal Arms Limitation." Talk given as part of J.D. Bernal Peace Library Lecture Series, October 1974; and Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, January 1975, pp. 8-16.
  • 89. "Nuclear Tests in 'Quake' Guise." The Guardian, January 28, 1975.
  • 90. "Making the World Safe for Plutonium." Council for a Livable World, March 1975; and Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, May 1975.
  • 91. "Why Magnets Work." The Times, April 11, 1975.
  • 92. "Thirty Years After Hiroshima -- or Rethinking the Unthinkable." Lecture, Washington, D.C., April 1975.
  • 93. "Nuclear Proliferation -- Thirty Years After Hiroshima." Physics Today, July 1975, pp. 23-29.
  • 94. "Energy Sources for the Future and Their Effective Utilization." Lecture, Oxford University, July 25, 1975.
  • 95. "Nominal Commitment in a New Home." The Guardian, July 17, 1975.
  • 96. "Arms Control of What?" Proceedings of the Twenty-Fifth Pugwash Symposium, Kyoto, Japan, August 1975.
  • 97. "What Changes Will Disarmament Bring?" Lecture, SANE Conference, New York, November 16, 1975.
  • 98. "What's Wrong With SALT?" Arms Control Today, December 1975.
  • 99. "Nuclear-Free Zones -- Old Wine in New Bottles?" Proceedings of the Twenty-Fifth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Madras, India, January 1976.
  • 100. "The Consequences of a Nuclear War." The Statesman's Yearbook, January 1976.
  • 101. "The Nuclear Bind." Skeptic, Issue 14, July/August 1976, p. 36.
  • 102. "A New Look at Nuclear Weapon-Free Zones." Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Mühlhausen, G.D.R., August 1976.
  • 103. "Can We Have National Security Without Arms Control?" Colloquium at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, January 25, 1977.
  • 104. "Arms Control and National Security: Some Comments on the Current Debate." Colloquium at M.I.T., March 3, 1977.
  • 105. "The Threat of Nuclear War." Presentation at the Borah Symposium, University of Idaho, March 22, 1977.
  • 106. "Nuclear Energy Without Nuclear Weapons Proliferation?" Ferguson Lecture at the Washington University, St. Louis, March 24, 1977.
  • 107. "Environmental Implications of Nuclear Power Production." Rhode Island Medical Journal, October 1977.
  • 108. "Science and International Security." Boris A. Jacobson Memorial Lecture, University of Washington, Seattle, December 5, 1977.
  • 109. "Nuclear Energy Without Nuclear Weapons Proliferation." U.C.L.A., February 17, 1978.
  • 110. The MX Missile: An Arms Control Impact Statement. M.I.T. Program in Science and Technology for International Security, Report #1, March 1978 (with M. Callaham, E. Hadjimichael, and K. Tsipis).
  • 111. "Moving Toward an Agreement on the Non-Use of Nuclear Weapons." Twenty-Eighth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Varna, Bulgaria, August 1978.
  • 112. "Nuclear Proliferation at the Non-Governmental Level." I.S.O.D.A.R.C.O., VII Course, Ariccia, Rome, August 1978.
  • 113. "Can Plutonium Be Made Weapons-Proof?" SIPRI Symposium, Stockholm, October 1978.
  • 114. Particle Beam Weapons. M.I.T. Program in Science and Technology for International Security, Report #4, December 1978 (with G. Bekefi, J. Parmentola, and K. Tsipis).
  • 115. "Can We Survive a Nuclear War With the Soviet Union?" Conference on Nuclear War, Washington, D.C., December 7, 1978.
  • 116. "Arms Control and National Security." Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, December 13, 1978.
  • 117. "Can Plutonium Be Made Weapons-Proof?" In Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Weapons Proliferation, Taylor and Francis, London, 1979.
  • 118. "Arms Control and National Security." University of Connecticut, Storrs, February 23, 1979.
  • 119. "Einstein and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons." Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, March 1979.
  • 120. "Einstein and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons." Jerusalem Einstein Centennial, Israel, March 19, 1979.
  • 121. "Einstein and the Politics of Nuclear Weapons." UNESCO Colloquium, Paris, May 10, 1979.
  • 122. "Einstein and the Quest for Peace." M.I.T. Symposium, Cambridge, May 14, 1979.
  • 123. "Nuclear Disarmament." Radcliffe Quarterly, June 1979.
  • 124. "Particle Beam Weapons." Institute for Defense Analysis, Washington, D.C., June 1, 1979.
  • 125. A Voice Crying in the Wilderness: Essays on Science and World Affairs. Pergamon Press, Summer 1979.
  • 126. "Looking to SALT III." Twenty-Ninth Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs, Mexico City, July 1979.
  • 127. "Einstein and the Quest for Peace." Puebla, Mexico, July 26, 1979.
  • 128. "Land-Based Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles." Scientific American, Vol. 241, No. 5, November 1979 (with K. Tsipis).
  • 129. "SALT and Nuclear Disarmament." Cambridge Forum, January 1980.
  • 130. "The Nature of Fallout." Conference on the Medical Consequences of Nuclear Weapons and Nuclear War, Cambridge, Ma., February 10, 1979.
  • 131. "Can Plutonium Be Made Weapon-Proof?" Chapter 5 in Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Weapon Proliferation, SIPRI (Taylor and Francis, London, 1979).
  • 132. "New Technology and the Arms Race." Proceedings of the 30th Pugwash Conference, Breukelen, Netherlands, 1980 (in press).

Bibliography B. Technical Publications and Lectures

Many of these publications can be found in Series 5. Writings and Publications
  • 1. "Effect of Nuclear Electric Quadrupole Moment on the Energy Levels of a Diatomic Molecule in a Magnetic Field" (with Willis E. Lamb, Jr.). The Physical Review, Vol. 67, Nos. 1 and 2, 15-33, January 1 and 15, 1945.
  • 2. "Proposed Neutron Spectrometer in the 10-1000 kev Range." The Physical Review, Vol. 70, Nos. 5 and 6, 429, September 1 and 15, 1946.
  • 3. "The Preparation of Pressed Ra+Be Neutron Sources" (with Herbert L. Anderson). The Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 186-188, March 1947.
  • 4. "Neutron Cross Sections of the Elements" (with H.H. Goldsmith and H.W. Ibser). Reviews of Modern Physics, Vol. 19, No. 4, 259-297, October 1947.
  • 5. "Delayed Neutrons from Pu239" (with F. DeHoffmann). The Physical Review, Vol. 72, No. 7, 567-569, October 1, 1947.
  • 6. "The Application and Experimental Basis of Pile Theory". Chapter 6, The Science and Engineering of Nuclear Power, (C. Goodman, Editor), Addison-Wesley Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1947.
  • 7. "On the Nuclear Electric Quadrupole Interaction in Molecular Spectra". The Physical Review, Vol. 72, No. 11, 1116-1117, December 1, 1947.
  • 8. "Inelastic Scattering of Fast Neutrons by Fe, Pb, and Bi" (with L. Szilard, S. Bernstein and J. Ashkin). The Physical Review, Vol. 73, No. 11, 1307-1310, June 1, 1948.
  • 9. "Delayed Neutrons from U235 After Short Irradiation" (with F. DeHoffmann and P.R. Stein). The Physical Review, Vol. 74, No. 10, pp. 1130-1337, November 15, 1948.
  • 10. "Nuclear Electric Quadrupole Moments and Quadrupole Couplings in Molecules" (Including Addendum Prepared). Preliminary Report No. 2, Nuclear Science Series, Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., Washington, D.C., May 1949.
  • 11. "The Photogenic Mesons." Technical Report No. 8, March 26, 1948, Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.
  • 12. "Nuclear Quadrupole Hyperfine Structure in Slightly Asymmetric Rotor Molecules" (with Geoffrey Knight, Jr.). Technical Report No. 123, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, June 10, 1949.
  • 13. "On the Inelastic Scattering of Fast Neutrons". The Physical Review, Vol. 75, No. 8, 1115-1123, April 5, 1949.
  • 14. "Angular Correlations in Successive Nuclear α-γ-Emission and the Excited State of Li7". The Physical Review, Vol. 75, No. 10, 1618-1619, May 15, 1949.
  • 15. "The Hyperfine Structure and Nuclear Moments of the Stable Chlorine Isotopes" (with L. Davis, Jr., C.W. Zabel, and J.R. Zacharias), The Physical Review, Vol. 76, No. 8, 1076-1085, October 15, 1949.
  • 16. "Showers of Minimum Ionizing Particles from Cosmic-Ray Induced Nuclear Disintegrations in Nuclear Emulsions" (with I.L. Lebow and L.S. Osborne). The Physical Review, Vol. 77, No. 5, 731-732, March 1, 1950.
  • 17. "Interim Report of the Fast Neutron Data Project" (with H. Feshbach, M.L. Goldberger, and V.F. Weisskopf). NYO-632 United States Atomic Energy Commission, August 1, 1950.
  • 18. "The α-γ-Angular Correlation in the Decay of Radiothorium" (with J.K. Beling and I. Halpern). The Physical Review, Vol. 84, No. 1, 155-156, October 1, 1951.
  • 19. "The Linear Electron Accelerator as a Pulsed Neutron Source". NUCLEONICS, Vol. 9, No. 4, pp. 51-57, October 1951.
  • 20. "Photomeson Production in Carbon and Hydrogen" (with D.H. Frisch, I.L. Lebow, L.S. Osborne and J.S. Clark). The Physical Review, Vol. 85, No. 4, 680-681, February 15, 1952.
  • 21. "Photomeson Production from Deuterium" (with I.L. Lebow, D.H. Frisch and L.S. Osborne). The Physical Review, Vol. 85, No. 4, 681-682, February 15, 1952.
  • 22. "The Magnetic Moment of K40 and the Hyperfine Structure Anomaly of the Potassium Isotopes" (with J.T. Eisinger and B. Bederson). The Physical Review, Vol. 86, No. 1, pp. 73-81, April 1, 1952.
  • 23. "Nuclear Moments". Annual Review of Nuclear Science. Vol. 11, 1953.
  • 24. The Neutron, Experimental Nuclear Physics, Vol. II, E. Segrè, Editor, John Wiley and Sons, New York, New York, 1953.
  • 25. "The Angular and Energy Distributions in Photomeson Production". The Physical Review, Vol. 89, No. 1, 330-331, January 1, 1953.
  • 26. "High-Energy Nuclear Physics". NUCLEONICS, Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 42-45, 60, February 1953.
  • 27. "High-Energy Photoproton Production by 325-Mev Bremsstrahlung Radiation" (with R.D. Godbole, A. Odian, F. Scherb, P.C. Stein and A. Wattenberg). The Physical Review, Vol. 94, No. 4, 1000-1010, May 15, 1954.
  • 28. "Search for the Production of μ-Meson Pairs by a 345-Mev Synchrotron Beam" (with A. Julian, A.C. Odian, L.S. Osborne and A. Wattenberg). The Physical Review, Vol. 96, No. 5, 1386-1390, December 1, 1954.
  • 29. "Nucleon Polarization Resulting from π-Meson Production". Il Nuovo Cimento, 12, 425-437, September 1, 1954.
  • 30. "Photomeson Production from Hydrogen% N. 1 del Supplemento al Vo. 2, Serie X, Il Nuovo Cimento, pp. 139-144, 1955.
  • 31. "The Photodisintegration of the Deuteron at High Energies and Associated Phenomena". N. I del Supplemento al Vol. 2, Serie X, del Nuovo Cimento, pp. 145-150, 1955.
  • 32. "Lectures on Pions and Nucleons by Enrico Fermi" (Editor, Feld). Nuovo Cimento, N. 1 del Supplemento al Vol. 2, Serie X, pp. 17-93, 1955.
  • 33. "High-Energy Nuclear Physics". NUCLEONICS, Vol. 13, No. 5, pp. 30-37, 1955.
  • 34. "Spin of the τ+Meson" (with A.C. Odian, D.M. Ritson and A. Wattenberg). The Physical Review, Vol. 100, No. 5, 1539-1540, December 1, 1955.
  • 35. "High-Energy Neutron Detectors Employing Liquid Scintillators" (with E.R. Christie, A.C. Odian, P.C. Stein and A. Wattenberg). The Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 27, No. 3, 127-131, March 1956.
  • 36. "Photoejection of High-Energy Nucleons from Nuclei and the Quasi-Deuteron Model" (with A.C. Odian, P.C. Stein, A. Wattenberg and R. Weinstein). The Physical Review, Vol. 102, No. 3, 837-843, May 1, 1956.
  • 37. "Nuclear Emulsions as a Quantitative Tool for the Measurement of Proton Polarization" (with B.G. Maglich). International Conference on Mesons and Recently Discovered Particles, Padova-Venezia, September 22-28, 1957.
  • 38. "Intrinsic Parity of K-Y Relative to N". International Conference on Mesons and Recently Discovered Particles, Padova-Venezia, September 22-28, 1957.
  • 39. "Asymmetry in Hyperon Decay". International Conference on Mesons and Recently Discovered Particles, Padova-Venezia, September 22-28, 1957.
  • 40. "Associated Production Near Threshold" (with G. Costa). International Conference on Mesons and Recently Discovered Particles, Padova-Venezia, September 22-28, 1957.
  • 41. "Mesons and the Structure of Nucleons I". Annals of Physics, Vol. 1, No. 1, 58-76, April 1957.
  • 42. "Kinematics of β-Decay and Parity Nonconservation in Weak Interactions". The Physical Review, Vol. 107, No. 3, 797-804, August 1, 1957.
  • 43. "Isotopic Spin Selection Rules and Parity Non-Conservation in the Decay of the Strange Particles". Il Nuovo Cimento, Serie X, Vol. 6, pp. 650-653, September 1957.
  • 44. "Selection Rules in the Production and Decay of Hyperons" (with G. Costa). International Conference on Mesons and Recently Discovered Particles, Padova-Venezia, September 22-28, 1957.
  • 45. "Possible Methods for Determining the Intrinsic Parity of the K Meson" (with G. Costa). The Physical Review. Vol. 109, No. 2, 606-607, January 15, 1958.
  • 46. "Mesons and the Structure of Nucleons II". Annals of Physics, Vol. 4, No. 2, June 1958.
  • 47. "Photoproduction of K Mesons and the Intrinsic Parities of the Strange Particles" (with G. Costa). The Physical Review, Vol. 110, No. 4, 968-973, May 15, 1958.
  • 48. "Photoproduction of π and K Mesons". A series of three lectures given at Cornell University in April 1958.
  • 49. "Some Comments on Associated Y-K Production Near Threshold By Pions and Photons". Annual International Conference on High-Energy Physics at CERN, p. 158, Geneva, 1958.
  • 50. "Asymmetry in Scattering of 150-Mev Polarized Protons in Nuclear Emulsions" (with B.C. Maglic). Physical Review Letters, Vol. 1, No. 10, G519 3/1 -G519 3/3, November 15, 1958.
  • 51. "Some Prospects for the Production and Observation of New Particles". Annals of Physics, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 323-348, July 1959.
  • 52. "Mesons and the Structure of Nucleons III (with G. Costa). Annals of Physics, Vol. 9, No. 3, 354-372, March 1960.
  • 53. "Use of Nuclear Emulsions as an Analyser of Proton Polarization: Application to the Polarization of Protons in the Photodisintegration of the Deuteron" (with B.C. Maglic and J. Parks). Il Nuovo Cimento, No. 2 del Supplemento al Vol. 17, Serie X, 241-252, 1960.
  • 54. "On the 'Quasi-Elastic Diffraction' Scattering of High-Energy Protons" (with Chikashi Iso). Il Nuovo Cimento, Vol 21m Serie X, pp. 59-68, 1961.
  • 55. "Angular Distribution in Nucleon-Nucleon 'Quasi-Elastic Diffraction' Scattering". CERN Report 1114/th. 178, April 17, 1961.
  • 56. "Angular Distribution in Nucleon-Nucleon 'Quasi-Elastic Diffraction' Scattering". CERN Report 1700/th. 193, June 30, 1961.
  • 57. "Angular Distribution of Protons from π-p Scattering at 900 Mev" (with Bogdan C. Maglic and Carol A. Diffey), The Physical Review, Vol. 123, No. 4, 1444-1451, August 15, 1961.
  • 58. "A Possible Means to Obtain Evidence Concerning the Spin of the K'-Meson" (with D.B. Lichtenberg). Il Nuovo Cimento, Serie X, Vol. 22, 996-1004, December 1, 1961.
  • 59. "Elementary Particle Physics". Lecture courses given at CERN in 1961. CERN Report 62-14, 1961.
  • 60. "Evidence for a Possible π-N Resonance in the P½, T=½" (with W.M. Layson). International Conference on High-Energy Physics, p. 147, CERN, Geneva, 1962.
  • 61. "Violation of Isotopic Spin Conservation in the Decay of Excited Mesonic States". Physical Review Letters, Vol. 8, No. 4, February 15, 1962.
  • 62. "Mesons and the Structure of Nucleons. Part IV. The Nucleon-Nucleon Potential" (with G. Costa). Annals of Physics, Vol. 18, No. 1, 47-64, April 1962.
  • 63. "Proceedings of the Conference on Photon Interactions in the BeV-Energy Range" (Editor). Laboratory for Nuclear Science, 1963, MIT Press.
  • 64. "Photon Interactions in the BeV-Energy Range". Physics Today, Vol. 16, No. 9, 56-60, 62, September 1963.
  • 65. "Pion-Nucleon Phase Shift Analysis" (with D.L. Roper). Proceedings of the Sienna International Conference on Elementary Particles, p. 400, Italian Physical Society, Bologna, 1963.
  • 66. "Total Cross Sections and Angular Distribution for π-+p+n From Threshold to 1151 MeV" (with Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group). Physical Review Letters, Vol. 13, No. 15, 486, October 12, 1964.
  • 67. "Total Cross Sections and Angular Distributions for π-p Charge Exchange in the Second and Third Resonance Regions" (with Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group). Physical Review Letters, Vol. 13, No. 18, November 2, 1964.
  • 68. "Gamma-Ray Proton Interactions between 0.5 and 4.8 BeV" (with joint Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group). Physical Review Letters, Vol. 13, No. 21, November 23, 1964.
  • 69. "N33(1238) and ρ° Production by High-Energy Photons" (with the joint Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group). Physical Review Letters, Vol. 13, No. 21, November 23, 1964.
  • 70. "Energy-Dependent Pion-Nucleon Phase-Shift Analysis" (with L.D. Roper and R.M. Wright). The Physical Review, Vol. 138, No. 1B, B190-B210, April 12, 1965.
  • 71. "New Type of Accelerator for Heavy Ions" (with G.S. Janes, R.H. Levy, H.A. Bethe). Physical Review, Vol. 146, No. 3, 925-952, May 20, 1966, also Avco Everett Research Laboratory Research Report 235, December 1965.
  • 72. "A Note on Baryon Masses, Mass Differences and Magnetic Moments, According to Various Symmetry Schemes". Chapter in Preludes in Theoretical Physics (in honor of V.F. Weisskopf). A. De-Shalit, H. Feshbach, L. Van Hove, Editors, North-Holland Publishing Co., Amsterdam, 1966.
  • 73. "Photoproduction on Hydrogen of ρ° Mesons between Threshold and 6 BeV" (Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group and the Weizmann Institute of Science). The Physical Review, Vol. 146, No. 4, 994-1000, June 24, 1966.
  • 74. "Quark Model for Parity-Conserving Non-Leptonic Decays". CEN-Saclay Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France, March 1967.
  • 75. "Analysis of γ-p Reactions in a Hydrogen Bubble Chamber to 6.0 BeV: Cross Sections and Laboratory Distributions" (Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group). Physical Review, Vol. 155, No. 5, March 1967.
  • 76. "Photoproduction of w° Mesons" (Cambridge Bubble Chamber and the Weizmann Institute of Science). Physical Review, 155, 1468, 1967.
  • 77. "Some Phenomenological Considerations on the Form of the Differential Cross Sections for Two-Body Elastic and Inelastic Interactions". Dept. de Physique des Particles Elementaires, CEN-Saclay, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France, March 1967.
  • 78. "Photoproduction of Strange Particles" (Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group and the Weizmann Institute of Science). Physical Review, Vol. 156, No. 5, April 25, 1967, p. 1426.
  • 79. "Production of N*(1238) Nucleon Isobar by Photons of Energy up to 6 BeV" (Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group). The Physical Review, 163, 1510, 1967.
  • 80. "Multipion Photoproduction at Energies up to 6 BeV" (Cambridge Bubble Chamber Group), The Physical Review, 169, 1081, 1968.
  • 81. "The Quark Model of the Elementary Particles". Lectures given in the Academic Training Programme of CERN. Report 67-21, August 24, 1967.
  • 82. "Study of the Total Neutral Cross Section in π-p Interaction in the Momentum Region 1.4-4.0 GeV/c" (Brown Univ.; Harvard Univ.; Univ. of Padua, Italy; Weizmann Institute, Israel; MIT). Physical Review Letters, Vol. 21, No. 12, September 16, 1968.
  • 83. "Angular Distributions of Pion Charge-Exchange Reactions in the Momentum Region of 1.4 to 4.0 GeV/c" (Brown Univ.; Harvard Univ.; Univ. of Padua, Italy; Weizmann Institute, Israel; MIT). Physical Review Letters, Vol. 21, No. 12, September 16, 1968.
  • 84. Models of Elementary Particles, Blaisdell, Waltham, Mass., 1969.
  • 85. "Summary of the Status of the λ-Excitation Quark Model of Meson and Baryon Resonances". Proc. Coral Gables Conf. on Fundamental Interactions at High Energy, January 22-24, Center for Theoretical Studies, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, 1969.
  • 86. "Charge Exchange and Production of n Mesons and Multiple Neutral Pions in π-p Reactions between 654 and 1247 MeV/c" (with C. Bastien, B.B. Brabson, Y. Eisenberg, V.K. Kistiakowsky, I.A. Pless, L. Rosenson, R.K. Yamamoto and 20 other authors at Brown University, Harvard, Instituto di Fisica dell'University di Padova and Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). Physical Review, Vol. 187, No. 5, 1827-1844, November 25, 1969.
  • 87. "Comment on 'Tests for Eightfold-Way Octets in the Baryon Spectrum'". The Physical Review, Vol. 2, No. 5, 952, September 1, 1970.
  • 88. "Brief Summary of Baryon Spectrum and its Interpretation According to the Quark Models". Chapter in Hyperon Resonances - 70, Moore Publishing Company, 1970, p. 467.
  • 89. Nuclear, Particle and Many Body Physics, Edited by P.M. Morse, B.T. Feld, Herman Feshbach, Richard Wilson. January 1972 (Vol. I); February 1972 (Vol. II), Academic Press, New York.
  • 90. "Study of the Two-Charged-Particle Final States of 3.9 GeV/c π±p Interactions Including a Longitudinal-Momentum Analysis of the One-Pion Production Channels" (with P.L. Bastien, et al.). The Physical Review, D3, 2047, 1971.
  • 91. "Momentum Dependence of the 180° π-p Charge-Exchange Cross Section" (with V. Kistiakowsky, et al.). The Physical Review, D6, 1882, 1972.
  • 92. The Collected Works of Leo Szilard: Scientific Papers. Bernard T. Feld and Gertrud Weiss Szilard, Editors, M.I.T. Press, 1972.
  • 93. "Radioactive Meson Decays in a Quark-Oscillator Model" (with S.B. Berger). Physical Review, D8, 3875, 1973.
  • 94. "Quark Model of Pion Photoproduction from Protons by Polarized Photons in the Resonance Region" (with S.B. Berger). Physical Review, D12, 3488, 1975.
  • 95. "The Quark Model of Elementary Particles". Colloquium at Queens College of the City of New York, May 1978.
  • 96. "Electromagnetic Decays of Charmonium States" (with S.B. Berger). Washington Meeting of the American Physical Society, April 1979.
  • 97. "Cross Sections for π- + p ⇒ n + kπ0 (k = 1 to 5) and π- + p ⇒ n + ε00 ⇒ 2γ) for Incident Pion Momenta Between 1.3 and 3.8 GeV/c" (with H.R. Crouch, Jr., et al.). Physical Review D, 1 June 1980.
  • 98. "Early History of Photomeson Production." Electron and Pion Interactions with Nuclei at Intermediate Energies, W. Bertozzi, S. Costa and C. Schaerf (eds ), Studies in High Energy Physics, Vol. 2 (Harwood Academic Publishers, 1980).

Bibliography C. Unpublished Writings

Many of these manuscripts can be found in Series 5. Writings and Publications
  • 1. Can We Take Non-Proliferation for Granted? (12/13/72)
  • 2. Dependence of the Critical Mass of Plutonium on Its Physical and Nuclear Properties (undated)
  • 3. Encyclopedia Article (8/15/47)
  • 4. Hyperon Decays and Symmetry Properties of the Weak Interactions (undated)
  • 5. International Cooperation in Science and Technology (undated)
  • 6. Next Steps in Arms Control -- Avoiding Two Steps Backward (12/21/68)
  • 7. Notes from Prague, Ithiel de Sola Pool (8/9/68) (Assumed to be Bernard Feld's)
  • 8. Prospects for Progress Towards Arms Limitations Agreements (10/19/64)
  • 9. Quark Model for the Non-leptonil Decays of Hyperons (1967)
  • 10. Tactical Nuclear Weapons -- Time for Reappraisal (2/26/68)
  • 11. Technological Aspects of World Security (undated)
  • 12. Technology and the Arms Race -~ Where Do We Stand? (undated)
  • 13. What's Your Name? (undated)
  • 14. What's Your Name? II, On Marriage (undated)

Processing Information

The portion of this collection received in 1979 was processed by Elizabeth Craig-McCormick in 1983. Materials received beetween 1984 and 2007 are unprocessed.
Title
Preliminary Inventory to the Papers of Bernard Taub Feld
Status
Completed
Author
Elizabeth Craig-McCormick
Date
Copyright 1983
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin
Sponsor
This portion of this collection received in 1979 was processed by Elizabeth Craig-McCormick under a grant from the United States Department of Education, Title II-C, in 1983. This finding aid has been encoded by the Center for History of Physics, American Institute of Physics, as part of a collaborative project supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, an independent federal agency.

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