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Jerome C. Hunsaker papers

 Collection
Identifier: MC-0272

Abstract

Jerome Clarke Hunsaker, a graduate of the US Naval Academy and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, taught the first course in aeronautical engineering and aviation design at MIT. In 1933 he was made head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, in charge of the course in aeronautical engineering, becoming head of the Department of Aeronautical Engineering when it was founded in 1939. The collection contains correspondence, photographs, and reports on the development of aeronautical engineering at MIT. During World War I he was in charge of all naval aircraft design, construction, and procurement, and documentation of this work includes reports, articles, and newsclippings on the flying boat NC-4, designed by Hunsaker, and the dirigible Shenandoah, whose design he supervised.

Dates

  • 1898 - 1969

Creator

Access note

This collection is open.

Intellectual Property Rights

Access to collections in the Department of Distinctive Collections is not authorization to publish. Separate written application for permission to publish must be made to Distinctive Collections. Copyright of some items in this collection may be held by respective creators, not by the donor of the collection.

Biography

Jerome Clarke Hunsaker, 1886-1984, BS 1908, United States Naval Academy; SM in naval architecture, 1912, ScD 1916, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was an officer in the Construction Corps of the US Navy, 1909-1926. In 1914, after a year studying aerodynamics and wind tunnel testing in Europe, he taught the first course in aeronautical engineering and aviation design at MIT, and in 1916 developed the first modern wind tunnel in the United States. During World War I he was in charge of all naval aircraft design, construction, and procurement. From 1926 to 1933 he worked in private industry, first at Bell Telephone Laboratories, where he developed a communications system for aircraft, and then at the Goodyear-Zeppelin Corporation, of which he was vice president. He returned to MIT in 1933 as head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, in charge of the course in aeronautical engineering, and became head of the Department of Aeronautical Engineering when it was founded in 1939. He received the (US) Presidential Medal for Merit for his many contributions during World War II, including service on the President's Council of the Office of Scientific Research and Development. His work focused on flight theory and aircraft design. He designed the flying boat NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic Ocean, and supervised the design of the dirigible Shenandoah, the first American rigid airship.

Extent

4.1 Cubic Feet (4 record cartons, 5 oversize folders)

Language of Materials

English

Location

Materials are stored off-site. Advance notice is required for use.

Related Materials in the Institute Archives and Special Collections

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Records of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AC 43).

Processing Information note

Some collection descriptions are based on legacy data and may be incomplete or contain inaccuracies. Description may change pending verification. Please contact the MIT Department of Distinctive Collections if you notice any errors or discrepancies.
Title
Guide to the Papers of Jerome C. Hunsaker
Status
Ready For Review
Author
Mark A. Vargas
Date
(Copyright 1988)
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Libraries. Department of Distinctive Collections Repository

Contact:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries
Building 14N-118
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge MA 02139-4307 US